Two Poems by Edward Harkness

Two Poems
by Edward Harkness

    Click button above to hear Edward Harkness read this poem, or click here to download poem in .mp3 format. Spoon    Thrift store find. Fifty cents. I like how stout it is, carv... Read More...
Three Poems by Jeff Gundy

Three Poems
by Jeff Gundy

  Click button above to hear Jeff Gundy introduce and read this poem, or click here to download the poem in .mp3 format. Palanga Stintas 2015   And in Palanga today one can find smelts baked o... Read More...

Two Poems
by Lauren Camp

 Click button above to play audio for this poem, or click here to download in .mp3 format.AdvancingAll that is solid melts into air...                                            -- Karl Marx  Your eye is a... Read More...

Sometimes We Fall
by Karen Xiao

 The day the boy, the father, and the mother went to the beach began as a beautiful one. The sun shone above the cumulus clouds which heaped and moved steadily along the horizon like white sails, blown by ... Read More...

Hong Kong through the Looking Glass:
“We need more bullets…”
by Dante Archangeli

By Dante Archangeli       "Oscar keeps asking me for more bullets ", Dev confided to us at lunch. Dev might be 20-something. Earlier Oscar told us he is 73 and looks older. Oscar is the caretaker of  a tiny Southeast Asian island marine reserve (let's call it Ranganju, not it's real name). He grew up far away, at least 30 kilometers, on the larger, but still not large, adjacent island. Locals call it the mainland. Dev is the new reserve manager, grew up a little further away, and studied Buddhism at the University of Hong Kong. Buying bullets wasn't covered in the curriculum. Dev continues, "He tells me he shoots at poachers to keep them from running away when he's trying to catch them. I'm worried that someone is going to get hurt, probably Oscar."

Hong Kong through the Looking Glass:
Is the Ocean Safe + Clean?
by Dante Archangeli

By Dante Archangeli       "Chinese people don't care about dirty water," Sam, my barber, asserted. We'd been discussing Hong Kong beaches and commiserating about how something that appears so beautiful from a distance can be so unpleasant up close. But Sam's declaration threw me for a loop. Just a minute before she'd told me about the beaches she wouldn't swim at because of the trash in the water and on the sand. "Ummm, but aren't you Chinese?" I asked. I knew that she'd grown up in Hong Kong, but my ability to differentiate Hong Kong Chinese from other Asian ethnicities isn't anywhere near as good as a native's. "Oh yes I'm Chinese" she confirmed with pride. "But I don't like to go swimming in dirty water. Other Chinese people don't care. They just go in." I suspect that nobody really likes swimming in dirty water and I hope the Hong Kong government cares. But it may have a narrow definition of dirty.