LitBridge Interviews Terrain.org Editor-in-Chief

Over on LitBridge today there's an interview with our tall drink of water and editor-in-chief Simmons Buntin. Here's an excerpt; read the whole thing over at www.litbridge.com/2013/04/05/interview-with-terrain-org. What sort of qualities do you look for in a manuscript or piece of work that you are considering for publication?  Surprise, delight, tone, voice—you know, excellence. What we seek is place-based work that sings (sometimes literally). That’s broad, I realize, but if you look at Terrain.org, you’ll find we like a variety of work in a variety of styles. In nearly every case, however, the work is eloquent, concise, and questioning. It has a sense of place, or a yearning to find that sense. What we don’t want is the stuff everyone has read before, or that feels like that—the nature walk, the suburbs are bad, the end of the world. Unless it knocks are socks off, which sometimes it does. And we don’t like typos. Now get ye over to the full interview.
Issue 31. Ruin + Renewal, Part II

Terrain.org Issue 31 Now Live!

The editors of Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments are delighted to announce the launch of our new Issue 31, with the theme of “Ruin and Renewal (Part II).” The Winter 2013 issue extends the “Ruin and Renewal” theme from our Fall 2012 issue, and includes the winning and finalist entries from our 3rd annual contests in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; a special “To Know a Place” section from six writers on Mount St. Helens; guest editorial by Alison Hawthorne Deming; new “Eyes on the Street” column from urban designer and landscape architect Ken Pirie; Downtown Silver Spring, Maryland, as the Unsprawl case study; ARTerrain gallery by Lucinda Bliss; and more. And if you’re reading this blog, you know the new dynamic, image-rich Terrain.org design is live, as well.

The Pleasure of a Long Conversation

Simmons B. Buntin Reviews Earth Works: Selected Essays, by Scott Russell Sanders The essays in Earth Works are anything but overwhelming, anything but pigeonholed into some endlessly debatable category of writing. What they are, rather, is a rich mix of beautifully crafted and progressive pieces that engage the reader in a long conversation.