Hong Kong through the Looking Glass:
Bicycle Transportation, Part 2
by Dante Archangeli

By Dante Archangeli       Peng Chau is a hair under one square kilometer in area, but over 6,000 people live and work there. It's served by several dozen ferries a days, as well as a number of shops, restaurants, bakeries, temples, and shrines. But what feels most prevalent is bikes. And the air seems cleaner than in other parts of Hong Kong. Maybe car-dependent localities the world over can learn quality-of-life lessons from Peng Chau and other communities where bicycles are an important transportation component.

Hong Kong through the Looking Glass:
Bicycle Transportation, Part 1
by Dante Archangeli

By Dante Archangeli       ". . . we never became a bicycle-riding community of the sort found in . . . less prosperous Asian cities." Denis Bray, first Hong Kong Commissioner of Transport writing in Hong Kong Metamorphosis       Mr. Bray's connecting bicycle-riding with lack of prosperity may shed light on Hong Kong's current leaders' dismissal of bicycling. Perhaps they consider biking to work or shopping as only what poor people in poor countries do because of necessity. That's unfortunate, because in today's world many affluent urban areas are encouraging bicycle transportation, not shunning it.

Hong Kong through the Looking Glass:
ERP: Pollute More, Pay More
by Dante Archangeli

By Dante Archangeli       Now that I don't own a car and frequently ride Hong Kong minibuses, I see more television, or at least commercial video, than I've seen since in years. Bus TV exposes me to Hong Kong phenomena that I'd otherwise be unaware of. For example, Fiona Sit has become my Cantopop muse. Other singers who are more doe-eyed or perky also appear on bus TV, but they don't match Fiona's arresting costumes, makeup, and imagery.  This post looks at schemes beyond bus TV that Hong Kong and Singapore have implemented or are considering, such as Electronic Road Pricing (ERP), to incentivize people to reduce the use of personal vehicles on crowed streets and like I do, use public transportation instead.

Hong Kong through the Looking Glass:
Congestion, Closed Roads + Umbrellas
by Dante Archangeli

By Dante Archangeli       It's congestion and cold season in Hong Kong. Some roads are closed and others are clogged. You see more face masks and I'm 2 for 2 for a long lasting autumn cough. Both last year and this year doctors told me that cooler weather is probably the cause. I wonder if "cooler weather" is the face saving way to say "worse air pollution". In fall the prevailing winds change from coming from the south over the ocean to coming from the north over China and you can see and smell the worsening air.

Hong Kong through the Looking Glass:
Population Control for Cars
by Dante Archangeli

By Dante Archangeli      A few weeks ago I compared Hong Kong's and Singapore's (SG's) drinking water sustainability efforts. Now I'll begin to do the same for transportation sustainability. This post looks at one way HK and SG try to reduce vehicle traffic volume. In future posts I'll examine measures that the different locations have (or haven't) carried out to try to relieve traffic congestion, reduce individual vehicle tailpipe emissions, encourage public transportation use, and support bicycle and pedestrian travel.